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Month: July 2012

A MAKER OF HISTORY By E. PHILLIPS OPPENHEIM

A Maker of History
A Maker of History
A Maker of History by Edward Phillips Oppenheim (22 October 1866 – 3 February 1946) an English novelist, in his lifetime a major and successful writer of genre fiction including thrillers. A tale of espionage and threatened war between Russia, Germany and England built around the Dogger Bank incident during the Russo-Japanese War.
Price: $1.47

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1914 by Lord French

1914 by Lord French
1914 by Lord French
Field Marshal John Denton Pinkstone French, 1st Earl of Ypres, KP, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCMG, ADC, PC (28 September 1852 – 22 May 1925), known as The Viscount French between 1916 and 1922, was a British and Anglo-Irish officer. Served as the first Commander-in-Chief of the British Expeditionary Force for the first two years of World War I. French oversaw the BEF in the Battle of Mons, battle of the Marne and 1St Ypres and the introduction of the Territorials before the disastrous Battle of Loos. French's disagreements with Kitchener and Haig saw him removed from command in 1915. This account of the fundamental campaigns of the beginning of the Great War highlights the difficulty of fighting against overwhelming odds with limited supplies and an allied army. Includes detailed maps....14MB download in PDF format.
Price: $1.49

“THE RETREAT FROM MONS

At 5 a.m. on the 22nd I awoke, as I had lain down to sleep, in high hopes. No evil foreboding of coming events had visited me in dreams; but it was not many hours later that the disillusionment began. I started by motor in the very early hours of a beautiful August morning to visit General Lanrezac at his Headquarters in the neighbourhood of Philippeville.

Soon after entering the area of the 5th French Army, I found my motor stopped at successive cross roads by columns of infantry and artillery moving south. After several such delays on my journey, and before I had gone half the distance, I suddenly came up with Captain Spiers of the 11th Hussars, who was the liaison officer at General Lanrezac’s Headquarters.

There is an atmosphere engendered by troops retiring, when they expect to be advancing, which is unmistakable to anyone who has had much experience of war. It matters not whether such a movement is the result of a lost battle, an unsuccessful engagement, or is in the nature of a “strategic manœuvre to the rear.” The fact that, whatever the reason may be, it means giving up ground to the enemy, affects the spirits of the troops and manifests itself in the discontented, apprehensive expression which is seen on the faces of the men, and the tired, slovenly, unwilling gait which invariably characterises troops subjected to this ordeal.

This atmosphere surrounded me for some time before I met Spiers and before he had spoken a word. My optimistic visions of the night before had vanished, and what he told me did not tend to bring them back. He reported that the Guard and 7th German Corps had since daybreak
advanced on the Sambre in the neighbourhood of Franière, and had attacked the 10th French Corps which was holding the river. The advanced troops had driven the Germans back; but he added that “offensive action was contrary to General Lanrezac’s plans,” and that this had “annoyed him.”

The 10th Corps had had to fall back with some loss, and were taking up ground known as the “Fosse Position,” on the south side of the Sambre. Spiers thought that the 10th Corps had been knocked about a good deal. He gave me various items of information gleaned from the Chief of Intelligence of the French 5th Army. These reports went to show that the German turning movement in Belgium was extending far towards the west, the right being kept well forward as though a powerful envelopment was designed. It was evident that the enemy was making some progress in his attempts to bridge and cross the Sambre all along the front of the 5th Army. There appeared to be some difficulty in finding General Lanrezac, and therefore I decided to return at once to my Headquarters at Le Cateau.

I found there that our own Intelligence had received information which confirmed a good deal of what I had heard in the morning. They thought that at least three German Corps were advancing upon us, the most westerly having reached as far as Ath.

The hopes and anticipations with which I concluded the last chapter underwent considerable modification from these experiences and events; but the climax of the day’s disappointment and disillusionment was not reached till 11 p.m., when the Head of the French Military Mission at
my Headquarters, Colonel Huguet, brought a French Staff Officer to me who had come direct from General Lanrezac. This officer reported the fighting of which Spiers had already informed me, and said that the French 10th Corps had suffered very heavily. When thinking of our estimates of losses in those days, it must be remembered that a dearly bought experience had not yet opened our minds to the terrible toll which modern war exacts.

The position of the 5th French Army extended from Dinant on the Meuse (just north of Fosse—Charleroi—Thuin back to Trélon) about five Corps in all. Sordet’s Cavalry Corps had reported that probably three German Corps were advancing on Brussels.

The German line facing the Anglo-French Army was thought to be “roughly” Soignies—Nivelles—Gembloux, and thence circling to the north of the Sambre, round Namur. A strong column of German infantry was advancing on Charleroi from Fleurus about 3 p.m. on the 21st. There had been heavy fighting at Tamines, on the Sambre, in which French troops had been worsted. General Lanrezac was anxious to know if I would attack the flank of the German columns which were pressing him back from the river.

In view of the most probable situation of the German Army, as it was known to both of us, and the palpable intention of its Commander to effect a great turning movement round my left flank, and having regard to the actual numbers of which I was able to dispose, it is very difficult to realise what was in Lanrezac’s mind when he made such a request to me.

As the left of the French 5th Army (Reserve Division of 18th Corps) was drawn back as far as Trélon, and the centre and right of that Army were in process of retiring, the forward position I now held on the Condé Canal might quickly become very precarious.

I, therefore, informed Lanrezac in reply that such an operation as he suggested was quite impracticable for me. I agreed to retain my present position for 24 hours; but after that time I told him it would be necessary for me to consider whether the weight against my front and outer flank, combined with the retreat of the French 5th Army, would not compel me to go back to the Maubeuge position.

I should mention that earlier in the day, on my return to Headquarters after my talk with Spiers, I had despatched the following message to General Lanrezac:—

“I am waiting for the dispositions arranged for to be carried out, especially the posting of French Cavalry Corps on my left. I am prepared to fulfil the rôle allotted to me when the 5th Army advances to the attack.

“In the meantime, I hold an advanced defensive position extending from Condé on the left, through Mons to Erquelinnes, where I connect with two Reserve Divisions south of the Sambre. I am now much in advance of the line held by the 5th Army and feel my position to be as forward as circumstances will allow, particularly in view of the fact that I am not properly prepared for offensive action till to-morrow morning, as I have previously informed you.

“I do not understand from your wire that the 18th Corps has yet been engaged, and they stand on my inner flank.”

I left my Headquarters at 5 a.m. on Sunday the 23rd and went to Sars-la-Bruyère (Headquarters of the 2nd Corps), and there I met Haig, Smith-Dorrien, and Allenby.

The cavalry had, during the 22nd, drawn off towards my left flank after heavy pressure by the enemy’s advancing columns, leaving detachments in front of my right to the east of Mons, which was not so severely threatened. These detachments extended in a south-easterly direction south of Bray and Binche, the latter place having been occupied by the enemy. They were in touch with the 5th French Army. Patrols and advanced squadrons had engaged similar bodies of the enemy and had held their own well.

The 2nd Corps occupied the line of the Condé Canal, from that place round the salient which the canal makes to the north of Mons, and extended thence to the east of Obourg, whence that part of the line was drawn back towards Villers-St. Ghislain.

The 5th Division was holding the line from Condé to Mariette, whilst the 3rd Division continued the line thence round the salient to the right of the line occupied by the 2nd Corps.

The 1st Corps was echeloned on the right and in rear of the 2nd.

I told the commanders of the doubts which had arisen in my mind during the previous 24 hours, and impressed on them the necessity of being prepared for any kind of move, either in advance or in retreat. I discussed exhaustively the situation on our front.

Allenby’s bold and searching reconnaissance had not led me to believe that we were threatened by forces against which we could not make an effective stand. The 2nd Corps had not yet been seriously engaged, while the 1st was practically still in reserve.

Allenby’s orders to concentrate towards the left flank when pressed by the advance of the enemy’s main columns had been practically carried into effect. I entertained some anxiety as to the salient which the canal makes north of Mons, and enjoined on Smith-Dorrien particular
watchfulness and care with regard to it.

They all assured me that a quiet night had been passed and that their line was firmly taken up and held.

The air reconnaissance had started at daybreak, and I decided to await aircraft reports from Henderson before making any decided plan.

I instructed Sir Archibald Murray, my Chief of Staff, to remain for the present at General Smith-Dorrien’s Headquarters at Sars-la-Bruyère, and gave him full instructions as to arrangements which must be made if a retreat became necessary. I then went on to Valenciennes. General Drummond (Commanding the 19th Infantry Brigade) and the French Commandant at Valenciennes met me at the station.

I inspected a part of the entrenchments which were under construction, and the disposition of the Territorial troops (two divisions under General d’Amade) which were detailed to hold them and to guard our left flank. The 19th Brigade (2nd Batt. R. Welsh Fusiliers, 1st Batt. Scottish Rifles, 1st Batt. Middlesex Regt., and 2nd Batt. Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders) was just completing its detrainment, and I placed Drummond under the orders of General Allenby commanding the Cavalry Division.

During this day (August 23rd) reports continued to reach me of heavy pressure on our outposts all along the line, but chiefly between Condé and Mons.

Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, it will be remembered, was now in command of the 2nd Corps, having been sent out from England in succession to Sir James Grierson on the latter’s untimely death.

After my conference with the Corps Commanders on the morning of the 23rd, I left General Smith-Dorrien full of confidence in regard to his position, but when I returned to my Headquarters in the afternoon, reports came to hand that he was giving up the salient at Mons because the outpost line at Obourg had been penetrated by the enemy, and that he was also preparing to give up the whole of the line of the canal before nightfall. He said that he anticipated a gap occurring in his line between the 3rd and 5th Divisions in the neighbourhood of Mariette, and he went so far as to make a request for help to the 1st Corps.

Up to this time there was no decided threat in any strength on Condé, Sir Horace, therefore, need not have feared an imminent turning movement, and, as regards his front, he was nowhere threatened by anything more than cavalry supported by small bodies of infantry.

At that time no directions for retreat had been issued from Headquarters, although the Chief of the General Staff had been left at Sars-la-Bruyère on purpose to give orders for such a movement if it should become necessary.

The General’s anxiety seems to have lessened later in the afternoon, for at 5 p.m. a message from the 2nd Corps said that the commander was “well satisfied with the situation.”

The 3rd Division was now effecting a retirement south of the canal to a line running west through Nouvelles, and this movement had the inevitable result of bringing back the 5th Division and handing over the bridges of the canal to the German cavalry.

Every report I was now receiving at Headquarters pointed to the early necessity of a retirement of the British Forces in view of the general strategic situation, and I did not, therefore, deem it desirable to interfere with the 2nd Corps commander.

Reports of German activity on his front continued to be received from the G.O.C. 2nd Corps. At 7.15 p.m. he asked for permission to retire on Bavai; at 9.45 he was again reassured—a Divisional Headquarters which had retired was now “moving forward again”; and at 10.20 p.m. he reported, “casualties in no way excessive; all quiet now.”

The line which the 2nd Corps had taken up for the night showed an average retirement of three miles south of the canal. During the late afternoon the advanced troops of the 1st Corps were engaged, but not seriously threatened; they held their ground.

During the late afternoon and evening very disquieting reports had arrived as to the situation on my right. These were confirmed later in a telegram from French Headquarters, which arrived at half-past eleven at night. It clearly showed that our present position was strategically untenable; but this conclusion had been forced upon me much earlier in the evening when I received a full appreciation of the situation as it then appeared at French General Headquarters. General Joffre also told me that his information led him to expect that I might be attacked the next day by at least three German Corps and two Cavalry Divisions.

Appreciating the situation from the point of view which all reports now clearly established, my last hope of an offensive had to be abandoned, and it became necessary to consider an immediate retreat from our present forward position.

I selected the new line from Jerlain (south-east of Valenciennes) eastwards to Maubeuge. This line had already been reconnoitred. The Corps and Divisional Staff Officers who were called into Headquarters to receive orders, especially those of the 2nd Corps, thought our position
was much more seriously threatened than it really was and, in fact, one or two expressed doubts as to the possibility of effecting a retirement in the presence of the enemy in our immediate front. I did not share these views, and Colonel Vaughan (Chief of the Staff of the Cavalry Division) was more inclined to accept my estimate of the enemy’s forces on or near the canal than the others were. His opportunities of gauging the enemy’s strength and dispositions had been greatly enhanced by the fine reconnoitring work done on the previous two or three days by the Cavalry Division. However, I determined to effect the retreat, and orders were issued accordingly.”

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Soldaten-Atlas Wehrmacht 1941

Soldaten-Atlas Wehrmacht   1941
Soldaten-Atlas Wehrmacht 1941
Soldaten-Atlas / Soldier Atlas, published by the Wehrmacht High command in late 1941. Cover says "for use inside the Wehrmacht only." Published for the soldiers at front to inform them about the ongoing war. Maps of Germany and Europe as it was shaped by the German forces in late 1941, NSDAP administrative structure of Germany, maps of the German WW2 campaigns prior to the invasion of Russia (Poland, Norway, France, Balkans) and explanation of the changing European map, several maps of the Sovjet Union as published after the start of operation Barbarossa, about half of the pages in color. Many charts of population, farming and industrial production. Maps of lost German colonies, maps of the invasion of Poland, Norway, Denmark, Holland, Belgium, France, Yugoslavia and Greece plus maps of racial groups of Europe and the world. Download (95MB)
Price: $19.99
Price: $4.99

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Japan’s Mein Kampf – The Tanaka Memorial

Japan's Mein Kampf  - The Tanaka Memorial
Japan's Mein Kampf - The Tanaka Memorial
Japan's Dream of World Empire: The Tanaka Memorial, by Baron Giichi Tanaka, Ed. with introduction by Carl Crow, Harper & Brothers, New York, 1942. Tanaka was Japan's Prime Minister from April 20, 1927 to July 2, 1929. Purported to be Japan's blueprint for conquest. This edition issued as wartime propaganda in 1942. Download (2.2MB)

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The Great Pacific War – by H C Bywater

The Great Pacific War - by H C Bywater
The Great Pacific War - by H C Bywater
The novel which chillingly predicted the Pacific War and influenced Japanese and US naval strategy

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 13

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 13
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 13
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Includes a General Index which comprises approximately 27,000 entries. Download Volume 13 now (442MB)

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 12

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 12
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 12
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 12 now (394MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 11

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 11
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 11
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 11 now (350MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 10

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 10
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 10
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 10 now (373MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 9

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 9
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 9
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 9 now (315MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 8

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 8
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 8
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 8 now (350MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 7

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 7
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 7
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 7 now (352MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 6

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 6
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 6
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 6 now (360MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 5

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 5
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 5
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 5 now (282MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 4

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 4
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 4
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 4 now (283MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 3

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 3
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 3
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 3 now (297MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 2

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 2
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 2
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 2 now (375MB)
Price: $4.97

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The Great War – The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict – Volume 1

The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 1
The Great War - The Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict - Volume 1
A comprehensive and detailed account of the Great War. The Great War - A Standard History of the All-Europe Conflict was a weekly magazine in 272 parts which was later bound into 13 large volumes ( totalling 6919 24cm W x 32.5cm H pages) . "A standard history of the World-Wide Conflict, including eye-witnesses' stories of striking incidents throughout the field of operations". The first part was published in August 1914, in a hurry to meet demand, as the popular opinion was that the war would be over by Christmas. Eventually the massive project went on to document the entire War, not just in Europe but world-wide with articles and coverage from Africa, Mesopotamia, Palestine, Gallipoli, Persia, China etc. "The 272 parts of The Great War will remain the unrivalled record of the most stupendous event in the history of humanity. Produced in the years of storm and stress, and often under distracting conditions, it will lack the poise and perspective of the cloistered historian's work, to be written a generation hence far removed from the passions and miseries of the events recorded; but it will at no time, near or distant, stand in fear of any rival as a vivid and fascinating pictorial record of the world-wide conflict". This is a history of the War written as it unfolded, with hundreds of maps, hundreds of full page engraving and thousands of photographs. It covers in depth the land, sea and air conflicts from all perspectives with considerable coverage of Empire Forces. A massive publication. Quality scans of each volume in easy to access PDF eBook format. Download Volume 1 now (365MB)
Price: $4.97

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THE FIFTH BATTALION HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY IN THE WAR 1914-1918

THE FIFTH BATTALION   HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY   IN THE WAR  1914-1918
THE FIFTH BATTALION HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY IN THE WAR 1914-1918
Published 1921 The 5th Highland Light Infantry was originally known as the 19th Lanark Rifle Volunteers, one of the Volunteer units raised in 1859. In 1880, it became the 5th Lanark Volunteers. The connection with the Highland Light Infantry began in 1887, when it was named the 1st Volunteer Battalion Highland Light Infantry, a detachment of which served in the South African War. On the formation of the Territorial Force in 1909, the present name was adopted. This book deals with the unit record of service in the war 1914-1918. The unit served in Gallipoli, Sinai, Palestine and France. Many illustrations and maps. Download (4.3MB)
Price: $4.99
Price: $2.99

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The Second Battle of the Marne – Michelin Guide

The Second Battle of the Marne - Michelin Guide
The Second Battle of the Marne - Michelin Guide
(in French - La deuxième bataille de la Marne) - a fascinating battlefield guide to the dreadful battle of the Marne in World War One - illustrated with numerous photos and maps. Published 1919. A fascinating guide to the frontline at the time when the wounds of war were fresh. Well illustrated. Download (8.75MB).
Price: $19.99
Price: $2.99

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FLAG AND FLEET HOW THE BRITISH NAVY WON THE FREEDOM OF THE SEAS

FLAG AND FLEET HOW THE BRITISH NAVY WON THE FREEDOM OF THE SEAS
FLAG AND FLEET HOW THE BRITISH NAVY WON THE FREEDOM OF THE SEAS
FLAG AND FLEET HOW THE BRITISH NAVY WON THE FREEDOM OF THE SEAS BY WILLIAM WOOD WITH A PREFACE BY ADMIRAL-OF-THE-FLEET SIR DAVID BEATTY. In acceding to the request to write a Preface for this volume I am moved by the paramount need that all the budding citizens of our great Empire should be thoroughly acquainted with the part the Navy has played in building up the greatest empire the world has ever seen. Colonel Wood has endeavored to make plain, in a stirring and attractive manner, the value of Britain's Sea-Power. To read his Flag and Fleet will ensure that the lessons of centuries of war will be learnt, and that the most important lesson of them all is this—that, as an empire, we came into being by the Sea, and that we cannot exist without the Sea. DAVID BEATTY, 2nd of June, 1919. The growth of the Royal navy, it's history and battles. Extensive coverage of the Navy in the First World War as well. Illustrated. Download (2MB).
Price: $4.99
Price: $2.99

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Defenders of Democracy

Defenders of Democracy
Defenders of Democracy
Defenders of Democracy; contributions from representative other arts from our allies and our own country, ed. by the Gift book committee of the Militia of Mercy. Many plates illustrating the book. Download (3.1 MB). This beautiful book is the expression of the eager desire of all of the gifted men and women who have contributed to it and of the members of the Militia of mercy to render homage to our sailors, soldiers, nurses and physicians who offer the supreme sacrifice to free the stricken people of other lands and to protect humanity with their bodies from an enemy who has invented the name and created the thing "welt-schmerz"--world anguish. But we want it do more than extol their heroism and sacrifice, we want The Defenders of Democracy to help them win the war.
Price: $2.99

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Before the War by VISCOUNT HALDANE

Before the War by VISCOUNT HALDANE
Before the War by VISCOUNT HALDANE
The purpose of the pages which follow is to explain the policy pursued toward Germany by Great Britain through the eight years which immediately preceded the great war of 1914. It was a policy which had two branches, as inseparable as they were distinct. The preservation of peace, by removing difficulties and getting rid of misinterpretations, was the object of the first branch. The second branch was concerned with what might happen if we failed in our effort to avert war. Against any outbreak by which such failure might be followed we had to insure. The form of the insurance had to be one which, in our circumstances, was practicable, and care had to be taken that it was not of a character that would frustrate the main purpose by provoking, and possibly accelerating, the very calamity against which it was designed to provide. 277 PAGES Illustrated. Download (1.3MB)
Price: $2.99

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British Airships – Past and Present by George Whale

British Airships - Past and Present by George Whale
British Airships - Past and Present by George Whale
British Airships - Past and Present by George Whale CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION CHAPTER II EARLY AIRSHIPS AND THEIR DEVELOPMENT TO THE PRESENT DAY CHAPTER III BRITISH AIRSHIPS BUILT BY PRIVATE FIRMS CHAPTER IV BRITISH ARMY AIRSHIPS CHAPTER V EARLY DAYS OF THE NAVAL AIRSHIP SECTION-- PARSEVAL AIRSHIPS, ASTRA-TORRES TYPE, ETC. CHAPTER VI NAVAL AIRSHIPS: THE NON-RIGIDS-- S.S. TYPE COASTAL AND C STAR AIRSHIPS THE NORTH SEA AIRSHIP CHAPTER VII NAVAL AIRSHIPS: THE RIGIDS RIGID AIRSHIP NO. 1 RIGID AIRSHIP NO. 9 RIGID AIRSHIP NO. 23 CLASS RIGID AIRSHIP NO. 23 X CLASS RIGID AIRSHIP NO. 31 CLASS RIGID AIRSHIP NO. 33 CLASS CHAPTER VIII THE WORK OF THE AIRSHIP IN THE WORLD WAR CHAPTER IX THE FUTURE OF AIRSHIPS. Download (2.8MB). Illustrated, lots of photographs.
Price: $2.99

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Foch the Man

Foch the Man
Foch the Man
Foch the Man - A Life of the Supreme Commander of the Allied Armies by Clara E. Laughlin. Published 1918. Illustrated. Ferdinand Foch became supreme commander of Allied forces in World War One. Foch, along with Joseph Joffre and Philippe Pétain became one of the three most prominent French military officers in the war. His position in military history was assured. Foch is the only French military commander to have been made an honorary field-marshall in the British Army and his standing was ensured by the placing of a statue of him in central London. Marshal Ferdinand Foch died in 1929. Download (0.7MB)
Price: $19.99
Price: $1.99

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Book of the War

Book of the War
Book of the War
A Concise View of its Causes, Countries Involved, Theaters of Action, Leaders and Chief Events shown in Parallel Columns and Striking Picture Maps - Compiled from official reports and edited by Henry W Ruoff. Published 1918.
Price: $19.99
Price: $0.99

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WITH THE IMMORTAL SEVENTH DIVISION

WITH THE IMMORTAL SEVENTH DIVISION
WITH THE IMMORTAL SEVENTH DIVISION
CONTENTS - CHAPTER I. The Seventh Division CHAPTER II The Trek through Belgium CHAPTER III The Welcome of a People CHAPTER IV A Chapter of Incidents CHAPTER V The First Battle of Ypres CHAPTER VI Concerning Officers and Men CHAPTER VII The Work of a Chaplain in the Field CHAPTER VIII The Care of the Wounded CHAPTER IX Work at the Base CHAPTER X A Closing Word -
Price: $2.99

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Canadian WW1 Military History – INTO THE JAWS OF DEATH and THE STORY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH (NORTH-WEST) BATTALION 1914 – 1917

Canadian WW1 Military History -  INTO THE JAWS OF DEATH and THE STORY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH (NORTH-WEST) BATTALION 1914 - 1917
Canadian WW1 Military History - INTO THE JAWS OF DEATH and THE STORY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH (NORTH-WEST) BATTALION 1914 - 1917
Private John "Jack" O'Brien was one of the original members of the 28th Battalion, starting out in No. 10 Platoon. He transferred to the 250th Tunnelling Company in May 1916 after a call for volunteers. He was working at Hooge on June 6, 1916 and was captured in the battle following the mine explosion under the 28th Battalion that day. He spent some time in a German POW camp before escaping with another man and writing Into the Jaws of Death about his adventures. Also includes The Story of the 28th (North-West) Battalion. The full text of this book is included with the book Into the Jaws of Death as a special offer to add background to Private O'Brien's amazing story. Download both books (1MB)
Price: $4.99
Price: $2.99

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Kitchener – Organiser of Victory by Howard Begbie. Published 1915. Illustrated

Kitchener - Organiser of Victory    by Howard Begbie. Published 1915. Illustrated
Kitchener - Organiser of Victory by Howard Begbie. Published 1915. Illustrated
Biography of England's military hero, touching briefly on his career in India, Egypt and South Africa. Written in the midst of World War I, when Kitchener was in charge of building up the British Army, this describes him as the embodiment of the "will of the entire British empire."
Price: $19.99
Price: $1.99

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WINNING A CAUSE – WORLD WAR STORIES BY JOHN GILBERT THOMPSON

WINNING A CAUSE - WORLD WAR STORIES      BY JOHN GILBERT THOMPSON
WINNING A CAUSE - WORLD WAR STORIES BY JOHN GILBERT THOMPSON
This volume contains the stories of the war of the character described, that were not included in Lest We Forget,—stories of the United States naval heroes, of the Americans landed in France, of the concluding events of the war, of the visit of President Wilson to Europe, and of the Peace Conference. In a word, emphasis is placed upon America's part in the struggle. This volume should be of even greater interest to American children than the first, for it tells the story of America's greatest achievement, of a nation undertaking a tremendous and terrible task not for material gain, but for an ideal. Illustrated. Download (2.4MB)
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