ozebook.com

The site for rare books in digital format: contact – pindan@hotmail.com

Category: War

At Suvla Bay – Being the Notes and Sketches of Scenes, Characters and Adventures of the Dardanelles Campaign – fully Illustrated

Attacking the Enemy! Stories about our navy.. Kleine Kriegshefte Nr. 7 – Ran an den Fiend (1940)


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Australasia Triumphant! by A. St John Adcock – Published 1916.

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Australia in the Great War – The Story told in Pictures

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Australia Versus Germany – The Story of the taking of German New Guinea

Australia Versus Germany - The Story of the taking of German New Guinea
Australia Versus Germany - The Story of the taking of German New Guinea
An account of the first military campaign undertaken single-handedly by the new Australian Nation. This book provides a detailed account of the opening campaign of the First World War undertaken by Australian Army and Navy forces. Following the outbreak of World War I, Australian troops captured Kaiser-Wilhelmsland and the nearby islands in 1914, after a short resistance led by Captain Carl von Klewitz and Lt. Robert "Lord Bob" von Blumenthal. The only significant battle occurred on 11 September 1914 when the Australian Naval and Military Expeditionary Force attacked the low-power wireless station at Bitapaka (near Rabaul) on the island of New Britain, then Neu Pommern. The Australians suffered six dead and four wounded — the first Australian military casualties of the First World War. The German forces fared much worse, with one German officer and 30 native police killed and one German officer and ten native police wounded. On 21 September all German forces in the colony surrendered. Includes numerous photographs and details of this little known campaign. Download in PDF ebook format (80MB).
Price: $4.95

 

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Australia Versus Germany – The Story of the taking of German New Guinea

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Australia Versus Germany – The Story of the taking of German New Guinea

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Australia’s Fighting Sons of The Empire – Western Australian edition – PORTRAITS & BIOGRAPHIES OF AUSTRALIANS IN THE GREAT WAR

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Australia’s Fighting Sons of The Empire – Western Australian edition – PORTRAITS & BIOGRAPHIES OF AUSTRALIANS IN THE GREAT WAR

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Australian Campaigns in the Great War being a concise history of the Australian Naval and Military forces 1914 to 1918

Australian Campaigns in the Great War
Australian Campaigns in the Great War being a concise history of the Australian Naval and Military Forces 1914 to 1918 by Lt the Hon. Staniforth Smith - with a preface by Ernest Scott. (160MB download). Includes 5 maps of Gallipoli, Western Front and Palestine campaigns and 16 illustrations. 206pp.
Price: $5.00

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Biography of author

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Miles Staniforth Cater Smith (1869-1934), politician and administrator, was born on 25 February 1869 at Kingston, Victoria, son of William John Smith, farmer, and his wife Margaret Gomersall, née Charlesworth, both English born. For much of his life he was known publicly as Staniforth Smith. Educated at St Arnaud Grammar School, he was employed in the Melbourne office of Goldsbrough Mort & Co. Ltd and went to Kalgoorlie, Western Australia, in 1896 to open an office for Reuter’s Telegram Co. Elected as a municipal councillor in 1898, he was mayor of Kalgoorlie in 1900-01. Large, handsome, sociable and confident, he was active in the Federation movement. He nominated for the first Federal Senate election in 1901 and was elected at the top of the State poll. In the Senate he sat in opposition to the Barton and Deakin governments in a bloc with his fellow Western Australians, a strong free trader and ardent advocate of the prohibition of ‘coloured’ immigrants. He supported J. C. Watson’s Labor government in 1904.

Seeking a special niche Staniforth Smith took up the study of tropical agriculture and, after visiting New Guinea, the Federated Malay States and Java, made such a good impression in debates on the Papua Act (1906) that he was favoured by Atlee Hunt, (Sir) Joseph Cook and Watson for the position of lieutenant-governor of Papua (formerly British New Guinea), for which he advocated a ‘strenuous developmental policy’. Prime Minister Deakin, who had initially hoped for the return of Sir William MacGregor, gave some encouragement to Smith’s aspirations but eventually gave acting administrator (Sir) Hubert Murray the office instead. Smith, appointed in January 1907 commissioner for lands and director of mines, agriculture and works, became his deputy with a dormant commission as administrator during Murray’s absence. He intrigued constantly against Murray for the next seven years and, when deputizing during his absence in 1910-11, led a grandiose expedition into the interior. Lost for some weeks and believed dead, his party was rescued at great expense and with wide publicity. He was censured for bumbling management and the loss of eleven carriers but on a visit to Britain in 1912 was fêted as an explorer. In 1923 he was awarded the patron’s medal of the Royal Geographical Society.

Staniforth Smith enlisted in the Australian Imperial Force in January 1916, failed to pass a short course for a commission at the Royal Military College, Duntroon, and sailed in June as warrant officer with the 44th Battalion. He was commissioned in September and served as battalion intelligence officer. Wounded in June 1917, he spent the rest of the war on staff duties in Britain. In 1919 he was appointed M.B.E. and after demobilization in September was invited to act temporarily as administrator to pacify the Northern Territory after the ‘Darwin Rebellion’ against J. A. Gilruth. He succeeded in his mission, acting as conciliator and as defender of the powerful North Australian Industrial Union. He also implemented recommendations made by Sir Baldwin Spencer seven years earlier as a solution to Aboriginal problems, gazetting extensive reserves and increasing expenditure. He resigned in 1921 when his proposals for Northern Territory representation in the Federal parliament were rejected.

Returning to Papua in 1921 as commissioner for crown lands, mines and agriculture, Smith devoted himself entirely to his duties and was as successful as the circumstances of the Territory allowed. He retired in 1930 and settled to farming at Kulikup in the south-west of Western Australia. On 4 April 1928 at St George’s Cathedral, Perth, he had married Marjorie Mary Bremer Mitchell, a niece of Sir James Mitchell; they had four children. He published several ephemeral books, declined an invitation to stand for the State parliament as a Nationalist candidate and died in Perth on 14 January 1934 of chronic nephritis, uraemia and myocarditis. He was buried with Anglican rites in the cemetery at Boyup Brook, near his home.

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Australian Chivalry

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Australian Chivalry

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Australians on the Western Front Battlefield Tour – 90 years on – Special digital edition

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Battlefields of ANZAC On which the Australasians won Deathless Fame

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Before the War by VISCOUNT HALDANE

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Book of the War

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British Airships – Past and Present by George Whale

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Campaign in Mesopotamia

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Canadian WW1 Military History – INTO THE JAWS OF DEATH and THE STORY OF THE TWENTY-EIGHTH (NORTH-WEST) BATTALION 1914 – 1917

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Close-up of the Jap Fighting Man

Text of a lecture delivered at the Command and General Staff School on Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in October 1942. It is a ‘psychological study’; and evaluation into the Japanese warrior: ‘This is our enemy. It will be wise for us to know as much as we can about this half-savage biped whose bandy legs have carried the sun-burst banner of conquest over a quarter of the globe, from the icy reaches of the Bering Sea to the burning sands of the southern islands.’

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Defenders of Democracy

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Der Adler – 1 June 1939 – Condor legion

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Der Adler – January 1940

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Der Adler – May 1939

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Eastern Nights and Flights

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FLAG AND FLEET HOW THE BRITISH NAVY WON THE FREEDOM OF THE SEAS

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Foch the Man

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For Empire – NSW’s Roll of Honour

For Empire - NSW's Roll of Honour
For Empire - NSW's Roll of Honour
For Empire NSW's Roll of Honour - First Expeditionary Force to the Motherland - Australia's Rally to the Dear Old Flag. Souvenir book issued to commemorate the First Contingent of NSW AIF soldiers who responded so readily to the Call to Arms to defend the English Motherland, (the Australian Government offered 20,000 troops on 3rd August 1914, by the end of September they were ready for the front). A piece of genuine militaria memorabilia. Fantastic geneology and military history item: of the first expeditionary force of 32,000 men from across Australia only 7,000 returned unharmed. Includes: b. a full listing of over 6.000 soldiers and officers of the NSW Expeditionary Force AIF, pictures of officers (including LtCol MaClaurin), picture officers of the 1st and 2nd Regiments Australian Light Horse, listing of Divisional HQ, 1st Light Horse, 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Bn, 2nd Bn, 3rd bn, 4th Bn 1st Field Artillery Brigade, Field Engineers, Army Service Corps, 1st Field Ambulance and Nurses. Full page pictures of march through Oxford St, training at Long Bay, marching on South Head, camps at Kensington, etc. An invaluable resource for the First World War collector and researcher. To order the ebook and download ( 88MB) click on the Add to Cart button.
Price: $21.99
Price: $7.99

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For Empire – Victoria’s Roll of Honour

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Gallipoli – Tribute to ANZACS

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