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Category: War

10 Stunden Schneller! – Kleine Kriegshefte Nr. 3 – 10 Hours Quicker (1940)

10 Stunden Schneller! -  Kleine Kriegshefte Nr. 3 - 10 Hours Quicker (1940)
10 Stunden Schneller! - Kleine Kriegshefte Nr. 3 - 10 Hours Quicker (1940)
10 Stunden Schneller! - Kleine Kriegshefte Nr. 3 - 10 Hours Quicker (1940) 36 pages - illustrated with pictures of the Invasion of Norway from a German perspective. (27MB download). The title reflects the German claim that they acted 10 hours before the British would have landed troops in Norway.
Price: $1.00

Sample pictures below – not full size

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1914 by Lord French

1914 by Lord French
1914 by Lord French
Field Marshal John Denton Pinkstone French, 1st Earl of Ypres, KP, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCMG, ADC, PC (28 September 1852 – 22 May 1925), known as The Viscount French between 1916 and 1922, was a British and Anglo-Irish officer. Served as the first Commander-in-Chief of the British Expeditionary Force for the first two years of World War I. French oversaw the BEF in the Battle of Mons, battle of the Marne and 1St Ypres and the introduction of the Territorials before the disastrous Battle of Loos. French's disagreements with Kitchener and Haig saw him removed from command in 1915. This account of the fundamental campaigns of the beginning of the Great War highlights the difficulty of fighting against overwhelming odds with limited supplies and an allied army. Includes detailed maps....14MB download in PDF format.
Price: $1.49

“THE RETREAT FROM MONS

At 5 a.m. on the 22nd I awoke, as I had lain down to sleep, in high hopes. No evil foreboding of coming events had visited me in dreams; but it was not many hours later that the disillusionment began. I started by motor in the very early hours of a beautiful August morning to visit General Lanrezac at his Headquarters in the neighbourhood of Philippeville.

Soon after entering the area of the 5th French Army, I found my motor stopped at successive cross roads by columns of infantry and artillery moving south. After several such delays on my journey, and before I had gone half the distance, I suddenly came up with Captain Spiers of the 11th Hussars, who was the liaison officer at General Lanrezac’s Headquarters.

There is an atmosphere engendered by troops retiring, when they expect to be advancing, which is unmistakable to anyone who has had much experience of war. It matters not whether such a movement is the result of a lost battle, an unsuccessful engagement, or is in the nature of a “strategic manœuvre to the rear.” The fact that, whatever the reason may be, it means giving up ground to the enemy, affects the spirits of the troops and manifests itself in the discontented, apprehensive expression which is seen on the faces of the men, and the tired, slovenly, unwilling gait which invariably characterises troops subjected to this ordeal.

This atmosphere surrounded me for some time before I met Spiers and before he had spoken a word. My optimistic visions of the night before had vanished, and what he told me did not tend to bring them back. He reported that the Guard and 7th German Corps had since daybreak
advanced on the Sambre in the neighbourhood of Franière, and had attacked the 10th French Corps which was holding the river. The advanced troops had driven the Germans back; but he added that “offensive action was contrary to General Lanrezac’s plans,” and that this had “annoyed him.”

The 10th Corps had had to fall back with some loss, and were taking up ground known as the “Fosse Position,” on the south side of the Sambre. Spiers thought that the 10th Corps had been knocked about a good deal. He gave me various items of information gleaned from the Chief of Intelligence of the French 5th Army. These reports went to show that the German turning movement in Belgium was extending far towards the west, the right being kept well forward as though a powerful envelopment was designed. It was evident that the enemy was making some progress in his attempts to bridge and cross the Sambre all along the front of the 5th Army. There appeared to be some difficulty in finding General Lanrezac, and therefore I decided to return at once to my Headquarters at Le Cateau.

I found there that our own Intelligence had received information which confirmed a good deal of what I had heard in the morning. They thought that at least three German Corps were advancing upon us, the most westerly having reached as far as Ath.

The hopes and anticipations with which I concluded the last chapter underwent considerable modification from these experiences and events; but the climax of the day’s disappointment and disillusionment was not reached till 11 p.m., when the Head of the French Military Mission at
my Headquarters, Colonel Huguet, brought a French Staff Officer to me who had come direct from General Lanrezac. This officer reported the fighting of which Spiers had already informed me, and said that the French 10th Corps had suffered very heavily. When thinking of our estimates of losses in those days, it must be remembered that a dearly bought experience had not yet opened our minds to the terrible toll which modern war exacts.

The position of the 5th French Army extended from Dinant on the Meuse (just north of Fosse—Charleroi—Thuin back to Trélon) about five Corps in all. Sordet’s Cavalry Corps had reported that probably three German Corps were advancing on Brussels.

The German line facing the Anglo-French Army was thought to be “roughly” Soignies—Nivelles—Gembloux, and thence circling to the north of the Sambre, round Namur. A strong column of German infantry was advancing on Charleroi from Fleurus about 3 p.m. on the 21st. There had been heavy fighting at Tamines, on the Sambre, in which French troops had been worsted. General Lanrezac was anxious to know if I would attack the flank of the German columns which were pressing him back from the river.

In view of the most probable situation of the German Army, as it was known to both of us, and the palpable intention of its Commander to effect a great turning movement round my left flank, and having regard to the actual numbers of which I was able to dispose, it is very difficult to realise what was in Lanrezac’s mind when he made such a request to me.

As the left of the French 5th Army (Reserve Division of 18th Corps) was drawn back as far as Trélon, and the centre and right of that Army were in process of retiring, the forward position I now held on the Condé Canal might quickly become very precarious.

I, therefore, informed Lanrezac in reply that such an operation as he suggested was quite impracticable for me. I agreed to retain my present position for 24 hours; but after that time I told him it would be necessary for me to consider whether the weight against my front and outer flank, combined with the retreat of the French 5th Army, would not compel me to go back to the Maubeuge position.

I should mention that earlier in the day, on my return to Headquarters after my talk with Spiers, I had despatched the following message to General Lanrezac:—

“I am waiting for the dispositions arranged for to be carried out, especially the posting of French Cavalry Corps on my left. I am prepared to fulfil the rôle allotted to me when the 5th Army advances to the attack.

“In the meantime, I hold an advanced defensive position extending from Condé on the left, through Mons to Erquelinnes, where I connect with two Reserve Divisions south of the Sambre. I am now much in advance of the line held by the 5th Army and feel my position to be as forward as circumstances will allow, particularly in view of the fact that I am not properly prepared for offensive action till to-morrow morning, as I have previously informed you.

“I do not understand from your wire that the 18th Corps has yet been engaged, and they stand on my inner flank.”

I left my Headquarters at 5 a.m. on Sunday the 23rd and went to Sars-la-Bruyère (Headquarters of the 2nd Corps), and there I met Haig, Smith-Dorrien, and Allenby.

The cavalry had, during the 22nd, drawn off towards my left flank after heavy pressure by the enemy’s advancing columns, leaving detachments in front of my right to the east of Mons, which was not so severely threatened. These detachments extended in a south-easterly direction south of Bray and Binche, the latter place having been occupied by the enemy. They were in touch with the 5th French Army. Patrols and advanced squadrons had engaged similar bodies of the enemy and had held their own well.

The 2nd Corps occupied the line of the Condé Canal, from that place round the salient which the canal makes to the north of Mons, and extended thence to the east of Obourg, whence that part of the line was drawn back towards Villers-St. Ghislain.

The 5th Division was holding the line from Condé to Mariette, whilst the 3rd Division continued the line thence round the salient to the right of the line occupied by the 2nd Corps.

The 1st Corps was echeloned on the right and in rear of the 2nd.

I told the commanders of the doubts which had arisen in my mind during the previous 24 hours, and impressed on them the necessity of being prepared for any kind of move, either in advance or in retreat. I discussed exhaustively the situation on our front.

Allenby’s bold and searching reconnaissance had not led me to believe that we were threatened by forces against which we could not make an effective stand. The 2nd Corps had not yet been seriously engaged, while the 1st was practically still in reserve.

Allenby’s orders to concentrate towards the left flank when pressed by the advance of the enemy’s main columns had been practically carried into effect. I entertained some anxiety as to the salient which the canal makes north of Mons, and enjoined on Smith-Dorrien particular
watchfulness and care with regard to it.

They all assured me that a quiet night had been passed and that their line was firmly taken up and held.

The air reconnaissance had started at daybreak, and I decided to await aircraft reports from Henderson before making any decided plan.

I instructed Sir Archibald Murray, my Chief of Staff, to remain for the present at General Smith-Dorrien’s Headquarters at Sars-la-Bruyère, and gave him full instructions as to arrangements which must be made if a retreat became necessary. I then went on to Valenciennes. General Drummond (Commanding the 19th Infantry Brigade) and the French Commandant at Valenciennes met me at the station.

I inspected a part of the entrenchments which were under construction, and the disposition of the Territorial troops (two divisions under General d’Amade) which were detailed to hold them and to guard our left flank. The 19th Brigade (2nd Batt. R. Welsh Fusiliers, 1st Batt. Scottish Rifles, 1st Batt. Middlesex Regt., and 2nd Batt. Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders) was just completing its detrainment, and I placed Drummond under the orders of General Allenby commanding the Cavalry Division.

During this day (August 23rd) reports continued to reach me of heavy pressure on our outposts all along the line, but chiefly between Condé and Mons.

Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien, it will be remembered, was now in command of the 2nd Corps, having been sent out from England in succession to Sir James Grierson on the latter’s untimely death.

After my conference with the Corps Commanders on the morning of the 23rd, I left General Smith-Dorrien full of confidence in regard to his position, but when I returned to my Headquarters in the afternoon, reports came to hand that he was giving up the salient at Mons because the outpost line at Obourg had been penetrated by the enemy, and that he was also preparing to give up the whole of the line of the canal before nightfall. He said that he anticipated a gap occurring in his line between the 3rd and 5th Divisions in the neighbourhood of Mariette, and he went so far as to make a request for help to the 1st Corps.

Up to this time there was no decided threat in any strength on Condé, Sir Horace, therefore, need not have feared an imminent turning movement, and, as regards his front, he was nowhere threatened by anything more than cavalry supported by small bodies of infantry.

At that time no directions for retreat had been issued from Headquarters, although the Chief of the General Staff had been left at Sars-la-Bruyère on purpose to give orders for such a movement if it should become necessary.

The General’s anxiety seems to have lessened later in the afternoon, for at 5 p.m. a message from the 2nd Corps said that the commander was “well satisfied with the situation.”

The 3rd Division was now effecting a retirement south of the canal to a line running west through Nouvelles, and this movement had the inevitable result of bringing back the 5th Division and handing over the bridges of the canal to the German cavalry.

Every report I was now receiving at Headquarters pointed to the early necessity of a retirement of the British Forces in view of the general strategic situation, and I did not, therefore, deem it desirable to interfere with the 2nd Corps commander.

Reports of German activity on his front continued to be received from the G.O.C. 2nd Corps. At 7.15 p.m. he asked for permission to retire on Bavai; at 9.45 he was again reassured—a Divisional Headquarters which had retired was now “moving forward again”; and at 10.20 p.m. he reported, “casualties in no way excessive; all quiet now.”

The line which the 2nd Corps had taken up for the night showed an average retirement of three miles south of the canal. During the late afternoon the advanced troops of the 1st Corps were engaged, but not seriously threatened; they held their ground.

During the late afternoon and evening very disquieting reports had arrived as to the situation on my right. These were confirmed later in a telegram from French Headquarters, which arrived at half-past eleven at night. It clearly showed that our present position was strategically untenable; but this conclusion had been forced upon me much earlier in the evening when I received a full appreciation of the situation as it then appeared at French General Headquarters. General Joffre also told me that his information led him to expect that I might be attacked the next day by at least three German Corps and two Cavalry Divisions.

Appreciating the situation from the point of view which all reports now clearly established, my last hope of an offensive had to be abandoned, and it became necessary to consider an immediate retreat from our present forward position.

I selected the new line from Jerlain (south-east of Valenciennes) eastwards to Maubeuge. This line had already been reconnoitred. The Corps and Divisional Staff Officers who were called into Headquarters to receive orders, especially those of the 2nd Corps, thought our position
was much more seriously threatened than it really was and, in fact, one or two expressed doubts as to the possibility of effecting a retirement in the presence of the enemy in our immediate front. I did not share these views, and Colonel Vaughan (Chief of the Staff of the Cavalry Division) was more inclined to accept my estimate of the enemy’s forces on or near the canal than the others were. His opportunities of gauging the enemy’s strength and dispositions had been greatly enhanced by the fine reconnoitring work done on the previous two or three days by the Cavalry Division. However, I determined to effect the retreat, and orders were issued accordingly.”

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23rd Bn (First Sportsmans) Royal Fusiliers – A record of its services in the Great War

23rd Bn (First Sportsmans) Royal Fusiliers - A record of its services in the Great War
23rd Bn (First Sportsmans) Royal Fusiliers - A record of its services in the Great War
23rd Bn (First Sportsmans) Royal Fusiliers - A record of its services in the Great War - by Fred Ward Published 1920 Includes roll of honour and Roll of those who served The Sportsmans Battalion was formed in London and was one of the Pals Battalions, excepting it was based on an individuals sporting prowess. So many wanted to join a second Sportmans Battalion was formed. As such the Sportsmans Battalion was unique in many ways having a mix of educated and sporting members, being quite cosmopolitan with few class distinctions. It was felt that the cream of the nation had answered the call. The battalion served in France from 1914-19. Includes illustrations. To order the ebook and download (9.36 MB) click on the Add to Cart button. For more detail, click on the thumbnail picture.
Price: $3.99
Price: $2.99

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28th Battalion AIF – Unit History

28th Battalion AIF - Unit History
28th Battalion AIF - Unit History
"The 28th: A Record of War Service in the Australian Imperial Force, 1915-19, Vol. I Egypt, Gallipoli, Lemnos Island, Sinai Peninsula" This volume is the only one produced at the time. Vol2 was never produced. The 28th Battalion was raised at Blackboy Camp in Western Australia on 16 April 1915. The battalion left Australia in June, and, after two months spent training in Egypt, landed at Gallipoli on 10 September. At Gallipoli, the 7th Brigade, which included the 28th Battalion, reinforced the weary New Zealand and Australian Division. Immediate download available in 2 files: 1st file is the unit history and the 2nd file is related pictures and maps, both in PDF format , 28 MB download in total.
Price: $12.99

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3rd Battalion AIF – Randwick to Hargicourt

 3rd Battalion AIF - Randwick to Hargicourt
3rd Battalion AIF - Randwick to Hargicourt
3rd Battalion AIF - Randwick to Hargicourt Unit History. The 3rd battalion took part in the ANZAC landing on 25 April 1915 as part of the second and third waves and served there until the evacuation in December. In August, the 3rd battalion took part in the attack on Lone Pine. In France the 3rd battalion fought at Pozieres, Ypres and on the Somme. The 3Bn AIF Unit History is available as a high quality PDF download - 200MB in 3 parts. 400 pages of text, maps and photos. Download all 3 files and unzip in one file.
Price: $16.99

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3rd Battalion AIF – Randwick to Hargicourt

 3rd Battalion AIF - Randwick to Hargicourt
3rd Battalion AIF - Randwick to Hargicourt
3rd Battalion AIF - Randwick to Hargicourt Unit History. The 3rd battalion took part in the ANZAC landing on 25 April 1915 as part of the second and third waves and served there until the evacuation in December. In August, the 3rd battalion took part in the attack on Lone Pine. In France the 3rd battalion fought at Pozieres, Ypres and on the Somme. The 3Bn AIF Unit History is available as a high quality PDF download - 200MB in 3 parts. 400 pages of text, maps and photos. Download all 3 files and unzip in one file.
Price: $16.99

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5LH AIF – The History of the Fifth Light Horse

5LH AIF - The History of the Fifth Light Horse
5LH AIF - The History of the Fifth Light Horse
5LH AIF - The History of the Fifth Light Horse. From 1914 to October 1917 by Brigadier General LC Wilson and From October 1917 to June 1919 by Captain H Wetherall. Published in 1926. This reproduction of the book includes photos and maps from the Unit history. This history covers the monumental activities of this unit as a member of the ANZAC Corps at Gallipoli and as part of the Desrt Mounted Corps in Palestine (where the unit took part in the last great cavalry action in history - The Battle of Bersheeba). Downloadable PDF ebook - 22MB. 144pages.
Price: $9.99

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A Brief Outline of the Campaign in Mesopotamia 1914-18

A Brief Outline of the Campaign in Mesopotamia 1914-18
A Brief Outline of the Campaign in Mesopotamia 1914-18
A Brief Outline of the Campaign in Mesopotamia 1914-18 BY LT-COL. R. EVANS, M.C., P.S.C - 1930. 135 pages. A contemporary review of this complex campaign. To order the ebook and download (17.7 MB) click on the Add to Cart button.
Price: $3.99

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A GENERAL SKETCH OF THE EUROPEAN WAR THE FIRST PHASE BY HILAIRE BELLOC

A GENERAL SKETCH   OF THE   EUROPEAN WAR  THE FIRST PHASE  BY  HILAIRE BELLOC
A GENERAL SKETCH OF THE EUROPEAN WAR THE FIRST PHASE BY HILAIRE BELLOC
Joseph Hilaire Pierre René Belloc (July 27, 1870–July 16, 1953) was one of the most prolific writers in England during the early twentieth century. This book first published in 1915, covers: THE GENERAL CAUSES OF THE WAR. (1) The German Object (2) Conflict produced by the Contrast of this German Attitude or Will with the Wills of Other Nations (3) Prussia (4) Austria (5) The Particular Causes of the War (6) The Immediate Occasion of the War PART II. THE FORCES OPPOSED. (1) The Geographical position of the Belligerents The Geographical Advantages and disadvantages of the Germanic Body The Geographical Advantages and Disadvantages of the Allies (2) The Opposing Strengths The Figures of the First Period, say to October 1-31, 1914 The Figures of the Second Period, say to April 15-June 1, 1915 (3) The Conflicting Theories of War PART III. THE FIRST OPERATIONS. (1) The Battle of Metz (2) Lemberg (3) Tannenberg (4) The Spirits in Conflict. Includes numerous maps and diagrams. To order the ebook and download (4MB) click on the Add to Cart button. To see more detail, click on the thumbnail picture.
Price: $4.99
Price: $2.99

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A HILLTOP ON THE MARNE By Mildred Aldrich Being Letters Written June 3-September 8, 1914

A HILLTOP ON THE MARNE      By Mildred Aldrich      Being Letters Written June 3-September 8, 1914
A HILLTOP ON THE MARNE By Mildred Aldrich Being Letters Written June 3-September 8, 1914
"August 3, 1914. Well—war is declared. I passed a rather restless night. I fancy every one in France did. All night I heard a murmur of voices, such an unusual thing here. It simply meant that the town was awake and, the night being warm, every one was out of doors. All day to-day aeroplanes have been flying between Paris and the frontier. Everything that flies seems to go right over my roof. Early this morning I saw two machines meet, right over my garden, circle about each other as if signaling, and fly off together. I could not help feeling as if one chapter of Wells's "War in the Air" had come to pass. It did make me realize how rapidly the aeroplane had developed into a real weapon of war. I remember so well, no longer ago than Exposition year,—that was 1900,—that I was standing, one day, in the old Galerie des Machines, with a young engineer from Boston. Over our heads was a huge model of a flying machine. It had never flown, but it was the nearest thing to success that had been accomplished—and it expected to fly some time. So did Darius Green, and people were still skeptical. As he looked up at it, the engineer said: "Hang it all, that dashed old thing will fly one day, but I shall probably not live to see it." A fascinating account of the opening days of the grand tragedy of World War 1. To order the ebook and download (.7MB) click on the Add to Cart button.
Price: $2.99
Price: $1.99

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A History of The Nations and Empires Involved and a Study of the of the Events Culminating in The Great Conflict

A History of The Nations and Empires Involved and a Study of the of the Events Culminating in The Great Conflict
A History of The Nations and Empires Involved and a Study of the of the Events Culminating in The Great Conflict
A History of The Nations and Empires Involved and a Study of the Events Culminating in The Great Conflict by Logan Marshall PREFACE When the people of the United States heard the news of the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand, heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary, and his wife in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on June 28, 1914, it was with a feeling of great regret that another sorrow had been added to the many already borne by the aged Emperor Francis Joseph. That those fatal shots would echo around the world and, flashing out suddenly like a bolt from the blue, hurl nearly the whole of Europe within a week's time from a state of profound peace into one of continental war, unannounced, unexpected, unexplained, unprecedented in suddenness and enormity, was an unimaginable possibility. And yet the ringing of the church bells was suddenly drowned by the roar of cannon, the voice of the dove of peace by the blare of the trump of war, and throughout the world ran a shudder of terror at these unwonted and ominous sounds. But in looking back through history, tracing the course of events during the past century, following the footsteps of men in war and peace from that day of upheaval when medieval feudalism went down in disarray before the arms of the people in the French Revolution, some explanation of the Great European war of 1914 may be reached. Every event in history has its roots somewhere in earlier history, and we need but dig deep enough to find them.
Price: $2.99
Price: $1.99

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A JOURNAL FROM OUR LEGATION IN BRUSSELS

A JOURNAL FROM OUR LEGATION IN BRUSSELS
A JOURNAL FROM OUR LEGATION IN BRUSSELS
A JOURNAL FROM OUR LEGATION IN BELGIUM BY HUGH GIBSON Secretary of the American Legation in Brussels Also includes Edith Cavell case. ILLUSTRATED FROM PHOTOGRAPHS - 214 pages - 2.7mb download. July 28, 1914.—Well, the roof has fallen in. War was declared this afternoon by Austria. The town is seething with excitement and everybody seems to realise how near they are to the big stage. Three classes of reserves have already been called to the colours to defend Belgian neutrality. A general mobilisation is prepared and may be declared at any time. The Bourse has been closed to prevent too much play on the situation, and let things steady themselves. In every other way the hatches have been battened down and preparations made for heavy weather. To-night the streets are crowded and demonstrations for and against war are being held. The Socialists have Jaurés, their French leader, up from Paris, and have him haranguing an anti-war demonstration in the Grande Place, where a tremendous crowd has collected. Nobody on earth can see where it will all lead. England is trying hard to localise the conflict, and has valuable help. If she does not succeed ..........
Price: $3.99
Price: $2.99

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A Journey Through France in War Time

A Journey Through France in War Time
A Journey Through France in War Time
A fascinating account of France in the Great War. Includes illustrations. A rare insight into the condition of France early in the war. 265 pages, 3.6MB download.
Price: $1.99

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A Kut Prisoner

A Kut Prisoner
A Kut Prisoner
The experience and individual fortune of a subaltern of the Indian Army Reserve of Officers who had his first taste of fighting at the battle of Ctesiphon, and was afterwards taken prisoner by the Turks with the rest of the Kut Garrison, ultimately succeeding in escaping from Asia Minor. An amazing tale of captivity and escape to Russia. Illustrated with photos and maps. 1.7MB download.
Price: $2.99

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A Prisoner in Turkey

A Prisoner in Turkey
A Prisoner in Turkey
A Prisoner in Turkey by John Still. 1920. Illustrated. At dawn on the 9th of August, 1915, the 6th Battalion of the East Yorkshire Regiment received an order to attack the great hill that towers above Anafarta. The order was late, hours too late, for the messenger had lost his way; so, although we did not know it at the time, we had already forfeited our chance, and were launched upon a forlorn endeavour. About thirty of us reached the top of the hill, perhaps a few more. And when there were about twenty left we turned and went down again. We had reached the highest point and the furthest point that British forces from Suvla Bay were destined to reach. But we naturally knew nothing of that. We reached the point where the ravine ended, and in the scrub ahead of us we saw a number of men who fired upon us. For a moment we thought they were our own, firing in ignorance. Then we saw that they were Turks. We had run into the back of an enemy battalion which held the lower slopes against our supports. They had crossed the range at a point lower than that we had attacked, and had cut in behind our climbing force. We could do nothing but surrender. The harrowing tale of imprisonment in WW1.Order and download this interesting book in PDF format now (38mb filesize).
Price: $2.99

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A SCHOOL HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR (complete with many pictures and maps)

A SCHOOL HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR  (complete with many pictures and maps)
A SCHOOL HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR (complete with many pictures and maps)
This brief history of the world's greatest war was prepared upon the suggestion of the National Board for Historical Service. Its purpose is to expand into an historical narrative the outline of the study of the war which the authors prepared for the Board and which was published by the United States Bureau of Education as Teachers' Leaflet No. 4, in August, 1918. To understand the Great War it is not sufficient to read the daily happenings of military and naval events as they are told in newspapers and magazines. We must go back of the facts of to-day and find in national history and personal ambition the causes of the present struggle. Years of preparation were necessary before German military leaders could convert a nation to their views, or get ready the men, munitions, and transportation for the war they wanted. Conflicts of races for hundreds of years have made the southeastern part of Europe a firebrand in international affairs. The course of the Russian revolution has been determined largely by the history of the Russian people and of the Russian rulers during the past two centuries. The entrance of England and Italy into the war against Germany was in each case brought about by causes which came into existence long before August, 1914. A person who understands, even in part, the causes of this great struggle, will be in a better position to realize why America entered the war and what our nation is fighting for. And better yet, he will be more ready to take part in settling the many problems of peace which must come after the war is over. For these reasons, the first few chapters of this book are devoted to a study of the important facts of recent European history. 2MB download.
Price: $2.99
Price: $1.99

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A SHORT HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR

A SHORT HISTORY OF   THE GREAT WAR
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR
A SHORT HISTORY OF THE GREAT WAR BY A. F. POLLARD M.A., Litt.D. FELLOW OF ALL SOULS COLLEGE, OXFORD PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH HISTORY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF LONDON WITH NINETEEN MAPS First Published in 1920 411 pages c/w foldout maps CONTENTS CHAP. I. THE BREACH OF THE PEACE II. THE GERMAN INVASION III. RUSSIA MOVES IV. THE WAR ON AND BEYOND THE SEAS V. ESTABLISHING THE WESTERN FRONT VI. THE FIRST WINTER OF THE WAR VII. THE FAILURE OF THE ALLIED OFFENSIVE VIII. THE DEFEAT OF RUSSIA IX. THE CLIMAX OF GERMAN SUCCESS X. THE SECOND WINTER OF THE WAR XI. THE SECOND GERMAN OFFENSIVE IN THE WEST XII. THE ALLIED COUNTER-OFFENSIVE XIII. THE BALKANS AND POLITICAL REACTIONS XIV. THE TURN OF THE TIDE XV. HOPE DEFERRED XVI. THE BALANCE OF POWER XVII. THE EVE OF THE FINAL STRUGGLE XVIII. THE LAST GERMAN OFFENSIVE XIX. THE VICTORY OF THE ENTENTE XX. THE FOUNDATIONS OF PEACE INDEX LIST OF MAPS 1. THE GERMAN INVASION OF FRANCE 2. THE BATTLES OF THE AISNE 3. THE CAMPAIGNS IN ARTOIS 4. THE DARDANELLES 5. THE RUSSIAN FRONT 6. THE BALKANS 7. MESOPOTAMIA 8. THE CAUCASUS 9. THE ATTACK ON VERDUN 10. THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME 11. THE RUMANIAN CAMPAIGN 12. THE CONQUEST OF EAST AFRICA 13. THE BALTIC CAMPAIGNS 14. THE BATTLES IN FLANDERS 15. THE ITALIAN FRONT 16. THE BATTLES OF ARRAS AND CAMBRAI 17. THE LAST GERMAN OFFENSIVE 18. THE CONQUEST OF SYRIA 19. FOCH'S CAMPAIGN A concise history of World War I written from the perspective of the early 1920s. Download 1.4MB
Price: $4.99
Price: $2.99

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A SOLDIER’S SKETCHES UNDER FIRE

A SOLDIER'S SKETCHES UNDER FIRE
A SOLDIER'S SKETCHES UNDER FIRE
"On the outbreak of the war I joined the Royal Fusiliers, uninfluenced by the appeal of wall-posters or the blandishments of a recruiting sergeant. My former experience as a trooper in the Hertfordshire Yeomanry being accounted unto me for military righteousness, I sailed with my regiment from Southampton on September 3rd, 1914. We experienced some exciting incidents on the way out; for instance, in the Bay we ran into a fog, and the order was given for all to stand by. For the next two or three hours all were in doubt as to what might happen—of course there was fear of torpedoes. We heard in the distance several shots fired, presumably by the battle-cruiser which was our escort. When the fog lifted, we could just see the smoke lifting on the horizon of some enemy craft, which had been chased off by our own warship. We again steamed ahead towards our destination and were soon sailing into smooth and calm waters, the temperature becoming quite genial and warm as we approached the Straits of Gibraltar. As we passed through the Straits the message was signalled that those two notorious vessels, the "Goeben" and the "Breslau," were roaming loose in the Mediterranean..........." An artist sketches and illustrates his experience of war in France. 2MB download.
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A Traveller in Wartime – Winston Churchill

A Traveller in Wartime - Winston Churchill
A Traveller in Wartime - Winston Churchill
"After the Russian peace, the Germans attempted to overwhelm the British by hurling against them vastly superior numbers of highly trained men. It is for the military critic of the future to analyse any tactical errors that may have been made at the second battle of the Somme. Apparently there was an absence of preparation, of specific orders from high sources in the event of having to cede ground. This much can be said, that the morale of the British Army remains unimpaired; that the presence of mind and ability of the great majority of the officers who, flung on their own resources, conducted the retreat, cannot be questioned; while the accomplishment of General Carey, in stopping the gap with an improvised force of non-combatants, will go down in history". An American novelist tours the front. 0.25MB download.
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A Visit to Three Fronts – Arthur Conan Doyle

A Visit to Three Fronts - Arthur Conan Doyle
A Visit to Three Fronts - Arthur Conan Doyle
A visit to the British, French and Italian lines in WW1

Sample pictures below – not full size

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    A Volunteer Poilu

    A Volunteer Poilu
    A Volunteer Poilu
    "I HAVE ventured to call this book A Volunteer Poilu principally because we were known to the soldiers of the Bois-le-Prêtre as "les Poilus Américains." Then, too, it was my ambition to do for my comrades, the French private soldiers, what other books have done for the soldiers of other armies. The title chosen, however, was more than complimentary; it was but just. In recognition of the work of the Section during the summer, it was, in October, 1915, formally adopted into the French army; a French officer became its administrative head, and the drivers were given the same papers, pay, and discipline as their French comrades". Americans in the French Army in WW1. Illustrated. 3MB download.
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    A Yankee in the Trenches

    A Yankee in the Trenches
    A Yankee in the Trenches
    I have tried as an American in writing this book to give the public a complete view of the trenches and life on the Western Front as it appeared to me, and also my impression of conditions and men as I found them - An American with the British Army in France. 0.75MB download.
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    Adventures in the Near East (Dunsterforce) – by LtCol Rawlinson

    Adventures in the Near East (Dunsterforce) - by LtCol Rawlinson
    Adventures in the Near East (Dunsterforce) - by LtCol Rawlinson
    An extraordinary tale of adventure in the sideshow of the Midlle East (Mesopotamia, Trans-Caucasia, Persia, Armenia, Turkey etc. ADVENTURES IN THE NEAR EAST 1918-1922 by A. RAWLINSON - in three parts - with Introductions by MAJOR-GENERAL L. C, DUNSTERVILLE - FIELD-MARSHAL SIR G. MILNE- GENERAL SIR CHARLES HARINGTON, . - General Introduction by ADMIRAL SIR PERCY SCOTT, BART - His book tells the story of his adventures in the Near East in a singularly attractive form; his account of capturing a Bol- shevik ship and piloting her out of Baku Harbour under very difficult circumstances will astonish many sailors. Four men against ninety-six enemy, with the only alternative of blowing up himself, his four men, the ninety-six enemy, and the ship, with dynamite, is a position that not many would enjoy; but it appeared to suit Rawlinson's constitution, for he remarks that after thirty- six hours of it he enjoyed a very good dinner. There is, however, a very sad side to his story, which, I am afraid, will very much distress many men and women of this country. Colonel Rawlinson put his uniform on in 1914, and did not take if off until March, 1923. He was cast into a Turkish prison for twenty months, and all but starved to death, as a consequence of which his health is impaired for life. He was also stripped of all he possessed by the Turks, including his two machine-guns which cost him over £500 in 1914, and which had done such valuable service all through the war. 287 pages with 2 maps the book covers the creation of the "Hush-Hush Army:, adventures in Trancaucasia and in Kemalist Turkey. To order the ebook and download (103MB) click on the Add to Cart button.
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    Adventures of A Despatch Rider

    Adventures of A Despatch Rider
    Adventures of A Despatch Rider
    AT 6.45 P.M. on Saturday, July 25, 1914, Alec and I determined to take part in the Austro-Servian War. I remember the exact minute, because we were standing on the "down" platform of Earl's Court Station, waiting for the 6.55 through train to South Harrow, and Alec had just remarked that we had ten minutes to wait. We had travelled up to London, intending to work in the British Museum for our "vivas" at Oxford, but in the morning it had been so hot that we had strolled round Bloomsbury, smoking our pipes. By lunch-time we had gained such an appetite that we did not feel like work in the afternoon. We went to see Elsie Janis. The evening papers were full of grave prognostications. War between Servia and Austria seemed inevitable. Earl's Court Station inspired us with the spirit of adventure. We determined to take part, and debated whether we should go out as war correspondents or as orderlies in a Servian hospital. At home we could talk of nothing else during dinner. Ikla, that wisest of all Egyptians, mildly encouraged us, while the family smiled. - on the Western Front in France - with maps - 7MB download.
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    Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War

    Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War
    Aeroplanes and Dirigibles of War
    Ever since the earliest days of the great conquest of the air, first by the dirigible balloon and then by the aeroplane, their use in time of war has been a fruitful theme for discussion. But their arrival was of too recent a date, their many utilities too unexplored to provide anything other than theories, many obviously untenable, others avowedly problematical. Yet the part airships have played in the Greatest War has come as a surprise even to their most convinced advocates. For every expectation shattered, they have shown a more than compensating possibility of usefulness. In this volume an endeavour has been made to record their achievements, under the stern test of trial, as an axiom of war, and to explain, in untechnical language, the many services to which they have been and may be applied. Illustrated - 1.5MB download.
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    Ambassador Morgenthau’s Story

    Ambassador Morgenthau's Story
    Ambassador Morgenthau's Story
    By Ambassador Morganthau, Formerly American Ambassador to Turkey - Illustrated. Published 1918. Inside story on the war in Turkey, the Gallipoli campaign, the downfall of the Sultan and the massacre of the Armenians. Henry Morgenthau was U.S. ambassador to Ottoman Turkey between 1913 and 1916. In 1914 he witnessed the Ottoman entry into World War I and the genocide of the empire"s Armenian population. His Story was an indictment against the Ottoman leaders for their entry into the world conflict and the mass murder of over a million Armenians. His account was written with the authority of a first-hand observer and remains one of the classic accounts of World War I. Originally published in 1918. Covers Turkey's entry into the war and the Dardanelles campaign as well. Profusely illustrated. 2.4MB download.
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    Antwerp to Gallipoli – A Year of the War – on Many Fronts

    Antwerp to Gallipoli - A Year of the War - on Many Fronts and Behind Them - Illustrated
    Antwerp to Gallipoli - A Year of the War - on Many Fronts and Behind Them - Illustrated
    A fascinating behind the scenes account of WW1.....Arthur Ruhl was privileged to see the Dardanelles and Gallipoli fronts from behind Turkish lines as well as the Western and Russian fronts. A keen observer his reports make fascinating reading. Note: This edition includes 30 photographs from the original publication. 376 pages. Contents: Chapter I. The Germans Are Coming! Chapter II. Paris At Bay Chapter III. After The Marne Chapter IV. The Fall Of Antwerp Chapter V. Paris Again—And Bordeaux: Journal of a Flight from a London Fogs Chapter VI. “The Great Days” Chapter VII. Two German Prison Camps Chapter VIII. In The German Trenches At La Bassee Chapter IX. The Road To Constantinople Chapter X. The Adventure Of The Fifty Hostages Chapter XI. With The Turks At The Dardanelles Chapter XII. Soghan-Dere And The Flier Of Ak-Bash Chapter XIII. A War Correspondents' Village Chapter XIV. Cannon Fodder Chapter XV. East Of Lemberg—Through Austria-Hungary to the Galician Front Chapter XVI. In The Dust Of The Russian Retreat Click on the thumbnail for more detail. Download ( 3MB) now by ordering below.
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    Anzac Memorial – RSL Imperial league of Australia – Published 1919

    Anzac Memorial  -  RSL Imperial league of Australia - Published 1919
    Anzac Memorial - RSL Imperial league of Australia - Published 1919
    Returned Sailors And Soldiers Imperial League Of Australia - 1919 Peace edition - 655 pages. Includes a Roll of Honour of the Australian Imperial Forces, soldier"s stories and verses, and general history of Anzacs in Gallipoli and France, with numerous b/w pictures. Article by CE Bean, Armisitice and Hamilton's Despatches. A wonderful record and memento of the AIF in World War 1. To order the ebook and download (161MB) click on the Add to Cart button.
    Price: $12.99

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    Anzac Memorial – RSL Imperial league of Australia – Published 1919

    Anzac Memorial  -  RSL Imperial league of Australia - Published 1919
    Anzac Memorial - RSL Imperial league of Australia - Published 1919
    Returned Sailors And Soldiers Imperial League Of Australia - 1919 Peace edition - 655 pages. Includes a Roll of Honour of the Australian Imperial Forces, soldier"s stories and verses, and general history of Anzacs in Gallipoli and France, with numerous b/w pictures. Article by CE Bean, Armisitice and Hamilton's Despatches. A wonderful record and memento of the AIF in World War 1. To order the ebook and download (161MB) click on the Add to Cart button.
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    Ashmead Bartlett’s Despatches from Gallipoli An Epic of Heroism

    Ashmead Bartlett's Despatches from Gallipoli    An Epic of Heroism
    Ashmead Bartlett's Despatches from Gallipoli An Epic of Heroism
    Ashmead Bartlett's Despatches from Gallipoli - An Epic of Heroism by Ashmead Bartlett - This book, published during the Great War covers the preparations for the assault on Gallipoli, the naval Battle of the Dardanelles, the landings at ANZAC and Cape Helles and the battles for Krithia, Achi Baba and the heights of ANZAC from March to July 1915. Includes a map of the peninsula. Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett (11 February 1881 – 4 May 1931) was a British war correspondent during the First World War. Through his reporting of the Battle of Gallipoli, Ashmead-Bartlett was instrumental in the birth of the Anzac legend which still dominates military history in Australia and New Zealand. Through his outspoken criticism of the conduct of the campaign, he was instrumental in bringing about the dismissal of the British commander-in-chief, Sir Ian Hamilton — an event that led to the evacuation of British forces from the Gallipoli peninsula which in turn contributed to the collapse of the Asquith government. To order the ebook and download (52MB) click on the Add to Cart button.
    Price: $21.99
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